Yes, your experience at a sporting event will improve dramatically. Soon.
And so you there you are.  Sitting in the stands.  Rooting on your school.  Your cross-state rival’s best player, a 4-year starter, steps to the free throw line.  His team down by 2 points.  1.7 seconds left on the game clock. You’re nervous.  Will he make both free throws?  Or 1?  Or brick both?  And then, instantly, before you can finish the thought, your phone vibrates.
BAM!  The odds of him making 1 free throw, both, or none, appear.  51% chance he makes both free throws to win the game.  Here’s your choice; charitybet $10 that your school wins the game.  Right now.  To win a $20 coupon from Heineken.  Oh, goodness, you could really go for a nice, cold Heineken to celebrate a victory.  
Do you do it?

Yes, your experience at a sporting event will improve dramatically. Soon.

And so you there you are.  Sitting in the stands.  Rooting on your school.  Your cross-state rival’s best player, a 4-year starter, steps to the free throw line.  His team down by 2 points.  1.7 seconds left on the game clock. You’re nervous.  Will he make both free throws?  Or 1?  Or brick both?  And then, instantly, before you can finish the thought, your phone vibrates.

BAM!  The odds of him making 1 free throw, both, or none, appear.  51% chance he makes both free throws to win the game.  Here’s your choice; charitybet $10 that your school wins the game.  Right now.  To win a $20 coupon from Heineken.  Oh, goodness, you could really go for a nice, cold Heineken to celebrate a victory.  

Do you do it?

This was posted 10 months ago. It has 0 notes. .
How excited are you for the future?  
With a seemingly endless news cycle of tragic stories, misbehavior, and a global economic outlook that’s tepid at best, it’s easy to be unsure of what the future holds.  Rest assure, the future is sensational.  Look up. Do you see the picture of Yankee Stadium?  Of course you do. Consider this;
Very soon you will consume every sporting event differently. The joy will remain.  In fact, it will be enhanced.  You can thank technology.  Because one day very soon while sitting at Yankee Stadium - or any sports arena - your mobile phone in hand, the world’s leading technologists will gather all the relevant information around you. And distill it.  Deliver it in real-time.  In a relevant way.  That prompts you to make a split-second decision.  To benefit you personally. And your family.  Your community. And the causes most meaningful to you too.  
How?
See you next post…

How excited are you for the future?  

With a seemingly endless news cycle of tragic stories, misbehavior, and a global economic outlook that’s tepid at best, it’s easy to be unsure of what the future holds.  Rest assure, the future is sensational.  Look up. Do you see the picture of Yankee Stadium?  Of course you do. Consider this;

Very soon you will consume every sporting event differently. The joy will remain.  In fact, it will be enhanced.  You can thank technology.  Because one day very soon while sitting at Yankee Stadium - or any sports arena - your mobile phone in hand, the world’s leading technologists will gather all the relevant information around you. And distill it.  Deliver it in real-time.  In a relevant way.  That prompts you to make a split-second decision.  To benefit you personally. And your family.  Your community. And the causes most meaningful to you too.  

How?

See you next post…

This was posted 10 months ago. It has 0 notes. .
Would you root for this guy?
Trell Kimmons is from Mississippi.  He’s fast.  He runs 100 meters in under 10 seconds.  He’s one of the fastest people in the world.  Trell’s goal is to finish in the top-3 at next week’s U.S. Olympic Trials.  If he does, he makes the U.S. Olympic Team.  Plus, if he finishes in the Top-3, lots of money will be donated to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America.  Your money.  Why?  Because you can charitybet on Trell’s performance at the Olympic Trials.  Isn’t that the way sports should be?  Great athletic performances should produce great advances in society.  
-CharityBets.com

Would you root for this guy?

Trell Kimmons is from Mississippi.  He’s fast.  He runs 100 meters in under 10 seconds.  He’s one of the fastest people in the world.  Trell’s goal is to finish in the top-3 at next week’s U.S. Olympic Trials.  If he does, he makes the U.S. Olympic Team.  Plus, if he finishes in the Top-3, lots of money will be donated to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America.  Your money.  Why?  Because you can charitybet on Trell’s performance at the Olympic Trials.  Isn’t that the way sports should be?  Great athletic performances should produce great advances in society.  

-CharityBets.com

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 0 notes. .
Manzano Mile. Bet on it!

2008 U.S. Olympian, Leo Manzano, is running a 1-mile race on Saturday, March 24th in Austin, TX.

The “Manzano Mile” track meet includes multiple 1-mile races to accommodate various age categories.  Here’s the best part…

Manzano himself will be running.  His goal is to break 3-minutes and 55-seconds.  3:55!  All of the money raised goes to support The Leo Manzano Foundation whose mission is to provide under-privileged kids with much needed footwear and apparel.

Will he break 3:55?  CharityBet him here —> https://charitybets.com/users/136-leo-manzano

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes.
Bet on Olympic athletes? This way, it’s OK

By Ashley Fantz, CNN
updated 11:06 AM EST, Thu February 9, 2012

(CNN) — There are few topics in sport more taboo than betting. Ask baseball’s Pete Rose.

But a new organization is wagering that it’s not only possible to openly bet on Olympic athletes, you can raise money for charity at the same time.

Charitybets.com, founded by Auburn University track and field alums, allows anyone to select from a roster of Olympic hopefuls who’ve agreed to let their performance be bet on. All money wagered will go to the charity of the athlete’s choice. It’s a first of its kind concept that’s sure to generate attention as the summer London 2012 Games draw closer.

It appears to have no opposition. Even the United States Olympics Committee thinks the idea is not betting, technically, and wouldn’t fly in the face of Olympic rules.

"On the surface, it seems to be a site dedicated to helping charities raise money, which we would obviously have no problem with," USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said.

When Khadevis Robinson agreed to participate, the four-time U.S. running champion who competed at the 2004 Olympic Games spent a long time doing his homework about the organization.

“The more I learned about this idea, it just seemed like a win-win,” he said.

Starting in June, anyone can bet on whether Robinson will score a spot at the Olympics when he competes at qualifying trials in Eugene, Oregon.

Here’s how it works: You could bet any amount (say, $75) that Khadevis will make the team or that he’ll go “over.” Or, you can bet any amount (say, $10) on the “under,” meaning he won’t make the team. If Khadevis qualifies, all $75 goes to his charity, the Boys & Girls Clubs of America. If he has a bad day, his charity will get only the amount you wagered against him.

Don’t feel like betting anything if he doesn’t make it? Put a zero in that “under” wager box.

"It would be nice if no one bet against me, but no matter what — for or against — it’s the same motivation because I know people are involved in my performance," Robinson said. "The Boys & Girls club in Fort Worth, Texas, helped me out a lot growing up. I didn’t have much, and I really depended on that place to keep me focused. I feel like it’s almost something I couldn’t turn away from if I had the chance, and it’s innocent betting."

Other Olympic hopefuls who’ve signed up with Charitybets.com include sprinter Walter Dix, who finished second to Usain Bolt in the 100 and 200 meters in world championships this summer, and runner Justin Gatlin, who took gold at the 2004 Olympics. Gamblers will be able to bet whether they’ll make the Olympic trials in Oregon as well, Charitybets co-founder Dave Maloney said.

The 32-year-old started Charitybets with Marc Hodulich, 31, a fellow former Auburn track teammate; both are the sons of breast cancer survivors. After graduation, the two took jobs in New York and worked with a lot of Wall Street go-getters with well-worn gym memberships who did triathlons and other weekend amateur events. They began brainstorming about how to inspire pros and weekend warriors to raise money for worthy causes.

The friends started Charitybets in November. The first competitor who signed with them was Michael Stember, a former NCAA All-American runner from Stanford University who represented the U.S. at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. Stemper is a retired runner but agreed to run a Thanksgiving 5K last year to raise money for a charity he selected.

"We saw from Michael that we had interest and concept that worked logistically," Maloney said. "Naturally, we wanted to take it to the biggest playing field possible."

2004 Olympic silver medalist Meb Keflezighi worked with Charitybets in January before competing at U.S. marathon trials in Houston.

Keflezighi set a place-based goal. The over/under on him was based on whether he finished the marathon in the top three.

The 36-year-old won the trial with a time of 2:09:08, setting a personal best by 5 seconds.

He signed up with Charitybets about two weeks before competing. Few people knew about it, but he still raised $1,000 for the Meb Foundation, which promotes health and fitness, according to his brother and manager, Merhawi Keflezighi.

The American distance star is considering teaming again with Charitybets at the London games.

"Anytime you can get spectators to invest in the race, in any way, it’s exciting," Merhawi Keflezighi said. "Once people understand the idea, I can’t imagine anyone not getting behind it."

Bet on Olympic athletes? This way, it’s OK

By Ashley Fantz, CNN
updated 11:06 AM EST, Thu February 9, 2012
(CNN) — There are few topics in sport more taboo than betting. Ask baseball’s Pete Rose.
But a new organization is wagering that it’s not only possible to openly bet on Olympic athletes, you can raise money for charity at the same time.
Charitybets.com, founded by Auburn University track and field alums, allows anyone to select from a roster of Olympic hopefuls who’ve agreed to let their performance be bet on. All money wagered will go to the charity of the athlete’s choice. It’s a first of its kind concept that’s sure to generate attention as the summer London 2012 Games draw closer.
It appears to have no opposition. Even the United States Olympics Committee thinks the idea is not betting, technically, and wouldn’t fly in the face of Olympic rules.
"On the surface, it seems to be a site dedicated to helping charities raise money, which we would obviously have no problem with," USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said.
When Khadevis Robinson agreed to participate, the four-time U.S. running champion who competed at the 2004 Olympic Games spent a long time doing his homework about the organization.
The more I learned about this idea, it just seemed like a win-win,” he said.
Starting in June, anyone can bet on whether Robinson will score a spot at the Olympics when he competes at qualifying trials in Eugene, Oregon.
Here’s how it works: You could bet any amount (say, $75) that Khadevis will make the team or that he’ll go “over.” Or, you can bet any amount (say, $10) on the “under,” meaning he won’t make the team. If Khadevis qualifies, all $75 goes to his charity, the Boys & Girls Clubs of America. If he has a bad day, his charity will get only the amount you wagered against him.
Don’t feel like betting anything if he doesn’t make it? Put a zero in that “under” wager box.
"It would be nice if no one bet against me, but no matter what — for or against — it’s the same motivation because I know people are involved in my performance," Robinson said. "The Boys & Girls club in Fort Worth, Texas, helped me out a lot growing up. I didn’t have much, and I really depended on that place to keep me focused. I feel like it’s almost something I couldn’t turn away from if I had the chance, and it’s innocent betting."
Other Olympic hopefuls who’ve signed up with Charitybets.com include sprinter Walter Dix, who finished second to Usain Bolt in the 100 and 200 meters in world championships this summer, and runner Justin Gatlin, who took gold at the 2004 Olympics. Gamblers will be able to bet whether they’ll make the Olympic trials in Oregon as well, Charitybets co-founder Dave Maloney said.
The 32-year-old started Charitybets with Marc Hodulich, 31, a fellow former Auburn track teammate; both are the sons of breast cancer survivors. After graduation, the two took jobs in New York and worked with a lot of Wall Street go-getters with well-worn gym memberships who did triathlons and other weekend amateur events. They began brainstorming about how to inspire pros and weekend warriors to raise money for worthy causes.
The friends started Charitybets in November. The first competitor who signed with them was Michael Stember, a former NCAA All-American runner from Stanford University who represented the U.S. at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. Stemper is a retired runner but agreed to run a Thanksgiving 5K last year to raise money for a charity he selected.
"We saw from Michael that we had interest and concept that worked logistically," Maloney said. "Naturally, we wanted to take it to the biggest playing field possible."
2004 Olympic silver medalist Meb Keflezighi worked with Charitybets in January before competing at U.S. marathon trials in Houston.
Keflezighi set a place-based goal. The over/under on him was based on whether he finished the marathon in the top three.
The 36-year-old won the trial with a time of 2:09:08, setting a personal best by 5 seconds.
He signed up with Charitybets about two weeks before competing. Few people knew about it, but he still raised $1,000 for the Meb Foundation, which promotes health and fitness, according to his brother and manager, Merhawi Keflezighi.
The American distance star is considering teaming again with Charitybets at the London games.
"Anytime you can get spectators to invest in the race, in any way, it’s exciting," Merhawi Keflezighi said. "Once people understand the idea, I can’t imagine anyone not getting behind it."
This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes. .
January 23, 2012

 Run For The Money

A new company has found philanthropy in sports gambling 


Dan Greene


In June, when Walter Dix, Justin Gatlin and Khadevis Robinson line up at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene, Ore., they will be sprinting for more than a spot in London. Each will be trying to win a bet that could reap thousands of dollars for charity.
The trio has partnered with Charity Bets, a nonprofit that has athletes set goals and then allows donors to wager on them. In the case of Dix (below), donors can give a certain amount to his charity if he finishes in the top three, and less if he falls short.
The program started with Dave Maloney, 32, and Marc Hodulich, 31, two old Auburn track teammates and each the son of a breast cancer survivor. Looking for a new way to raise money for cancer research—and capitalizing on what Maloney calls “a culture of betting and assessing risk”—the pair began taking similar bets in 2009 for a Wall Street athletic competition.
In November they took the idea mainstream, as Charity Bets, and last weekend it paid off as U.S. Olympic marathon trials winner Meb Keflezighi earned more than $1,000 for his Meb Foundation (page 27). It was the first major event for Charity Bets, which aims to expand to include team sports. “I think we’re on the cusp [of something big],” Maloney says of the organization.
Bet on it.

January 23, 2012

 Run For The Money

A new company has found philanthropy in sports gambling 

In June, when Walter Dix, Justin Gatlin and Khadevis Robinson line up at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene, Ore., they will be sprinting for more than a spot in London. Each will be trying to win a bet that could reap thousands of dollars for charity.

The trio has partnered with Charity Bets, a nonprofit that has athletes set goals and then allows donors to wager on them. In the case of Dix (below), donors can give a certain amount to his charity if he finishes in the top three, and less if he falls short.

The program started with Dave Maloney, 32, and Marc Hodulich, 31, two old Auburn track teammates and each the son of a breast cancer survivor. Looking for a new way to raise money for cancer research—and capitalizing on what Maloney calls “a culture of betting and assessing risk”—the pair began taking similar bets in 2009 for a Wall Street athletic competition.

In November they took the idea mainstream, as Charity Bets, and last weekend it paid off as U.S. Olympic marathon trials winner Meb Keflezighi earned more than $1,000 for his Meb Foundation (page 27). It was the first major event for Charity Bets, which aims to expand to include team sports. “I think we’re on the cusp [of something big],” Maloney says of the organization.

Bet on it.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 2 notes. .
gambling vs. CharityBets.  (con’t)
The House.  In gambling, there is an entity often referred to as ‘the house’ which collects all money wagered, keeps that money if a wager is incorrect, and distributes money to a person if his/her wager is correct.  
With CharityBets, there is no house.  Remember, a charitybet is a performance-based donation.  No matter what, the person placing the charitybet is always making a donation.  If your team loses, you may donate less than expected.  If your team wins, you may donate more.  Regardless, you’re making a donation - the amount of which is finalized after the result of an athletic event is known.

gambling vs. CharityBets.  (con’t)

The House.  In gambling, there is an entity often referred to as ‘the house’ which collects all money wagered, keeps that money if a wager is incorrect, and distributes money to a person if his/her wager is correct.  

With CharityBets, there is no house.  Remember, a charitybet is a performance-based donation.  No matter what, the person placing the charitybet is always making a donation.  If your team loses, you may donate less than expected.  If your team wins, you may donate more.  Regardless, you’re making a donation - the amount of which is finalized after the result of an athletic event is known.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 1 note. .
Sports have always been judged by wins and losses. It [sports] will now also be judged by dollars raised.

Marc Hodulich, co-Founder

CharityBets.com

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes.

gambling vs. CharityBets. The difference?

To many, this is the first you’re reading about CharityBets.  For a few, you know about the coming paradigm shift, so for you, we’ll borrow a line from S-dot-Carter, “allow me to reintroduce myself, my name is…”

What’s CharityBets?  It is performance-based donating.  Done online.  Through proprietary technology that actually makes donating fun.  Yup, imagine that.

Key differences from gambling?  First, nobody would ever charitybet instead of gamble if that person’s intent was to make money.  Because nobody ever wins, or loses, money by charitybetting.  The beneficiary of a charitybet can only be a recognized charitable organization.  By “recognized” we mean a 501c3 organization.  Bottom line; you can’t win, or lose, money by charitybetting.  

Let’s leave it there for now.  Another teaspoon of knowledge drops tomorrow.  ’til then, here’s a picture of U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials champ, Meb Keflezighi.  Yup, he uses CharityBets.  

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes.
Bet on Olympic athletes? This way, it’s OK

Bet on Olympic athletes? This way, it’s OK

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 1 note. .